Loading...
 

hammond_robin

Robin Hammond Photographer, Co-founder Witness Change, Human Rights Activist, Supports LGBT rights, No Health Without Mental Health, Love animals so I don't eat em! http://www.onedayinmyworld.com/
196 posts
176.2k followers
1,135 following

Photo @hammond_robin. looking back at work from lagos. it was quite often that i was the least fashionable person at the party while working in lagos… was absolutely the case at african fashion week

1 weeks ago comment 13 star 1,920

Photo @hammond_robin. looking back at lagos. the venice of africa - makoko: a shortage of housing for the city’s poor means these lagos’ inhabitants live in informal housing suspended over water.

1 weeks ago comment 36 star 3,723

Photo hammond_robin. looking back at my work from lagos. one of my motivations to make work on lagos, nigeria (africa’s biggest city - over 20 million people) was to illustrate its massive diversity. in a way, its analogous to the continent itself which is often depicted as only poor or war torn (and i’ve done a lot of work which can be said to to contribute to that perception!). there is poverty for sure, but also enormous wealth. fortunately for me, lagosians quite like to flaunt it. this image is from an event sponsored by an international alcohol producer at the night club 1eleven on victoria island in lagos.

2 weeks ago comment 5 star 1,510

Photo @hammond_robin. a look back at work i made in lagos, nigeria: sand dug from the bottom of lagos lagoon is used to reclaim land and to make the concrete blocks many of the city’s houses are made from. much of that sand is dug by hand. these are sand miners who dive 4 – 5 metres to the bottom of the lagoon and, one bucket at a time, fill the boats powered by wind - propelled with sails made of rice sacks. my fixer regularly risked his welfare while working with me in lagos - but coming out on the water on these stitched together boats was too much of a stretch - he stayed on shore.

2 weeks ago comment 34 star 3,351

Photo @hammond_robin remembering lagos. the work started with a grant, then became a @natgeo assignment and then a book ‘my lagos.’ this is the lagos cigar club.

2 weeks ago comment 6 star 750

Photo @hammond_robin found myself flicking through ‘my lagos’ - my book on africa’s biggest city - earlier this week. i feel compelled to share… this is elegushi private beach in lagos.

2 weeks ago comment 9 star 1,216

Photo @hammond_robin for @whereloveisillegal // “i'm really, really afraid of hiv, but because of the money i get and the difficult access to jobs… i have to expose myself and run risks.” like many trans women in mozambique, #transphobia excludes 23 year old pepetsa from regular employment. in order to survive she relies on income from s*x work. estimates of h*v infection rates in mozambican men and trans women who have s*x with men are as high as 30%, but there is little certainty of exact statistics given the lack of data and the taboo around lgbtqi+ people in the country. // where love is illegal traveled to kenya, mozambique and ghana with the support of elton john aids foundation (@ejaf ) to continue our work sharing lgbtqi+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. around the world, grants made by the elton john aids foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. for more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org // this is a @witness_change project. for more stories of survival or to share your own story follow @whereloveisillegal

2 weeks ago comment 13 star 1,562

Photo @hammond_robin. to see more follow @whereloveisillegal // “we thought love never existed in our world,” says ben. “little did we know love is everywhere - but the challenge is bitter.” ben (above) and john (below), a g*y couple from ghana, have been together for three years. the love they share is a secret. they know that to be openly g*y in ghana would provoke the glare of disapproval, or worse - homophobia is a violent kind of bigotry: “i was attacked by gang guys twice,” says ben. “the first i was beaten, second, my partner and i was attacked by a gun. his hand was shot and had to go under a surgery - all in the name of stigma and discrimination in ghana. we’re living in a world of fear.” // where love is illegal traveled to kenya, mozambique and ghana with the support of elton john aids foundation (@ejaf ) to continue our work sharing lgbtqi+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. around the world, grants made by the elton john aids foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. for more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org // this is a @witness_change project. for more stories of survival or to share your own story follow @whereloveisillegal

2 weeks ago comment 32 star 4,576

Photo @hammond_robin for @whereloveisillegal // “she was expelled from the house and i had to take responsibility and take claudia to live with me,” says jo (right). claudia (left), a 24 year-old lesbian woman, and jo, a 31 year old transgender man, are from mozambique. they have been in a relationship for over five years. in much of the world it is sadly common for lgbtqi+ youth to be “expelled” from their homes when they come out to parents. happily claudia’s mother and father have grown to accept that neither she, nor her love for jo, will change. // where love is illegal traveled to kenya, mozambique and ghana with the support of elton john aids foundation (@ejaf ) to continue our work sharing lgbtqi+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. around the world, grants made by the elton john aids foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. for more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org // this is a @witness_change project. for more stories of survival or to share your own story follow @whereloveisillegal

3 weeks ago comment 19 star 2,156

Photo @hammond_robin for @whereloveisillegal . homophobia has moulded much of annobil’s life. as a g*y man in ghana, everyday, where he goes, how he talks, walks, dresses must be carefully considered. there is a strong link between high h*v infections and the prevalence of a society’s homophobic attitudes. annobil is h*v positive. but homophobia has given annobil an unintended gift – he has found a level of resilience he didn’t know he possessed. the persecution he faces and the infection he carries provides him with life experiences he has turned into lessons he now shares. it has made him a leader in the lgbtqi+ community and a healthcare advocate. annobil helps community members get tested, and, in a region where access to care is not always made easy, he ensures they can get the medication they need. “stigma is killing people in our community,” he says. “we need to change our attitudes toward the msm (men who have s*x with men) people or the positive ones. because we all human being.” // where love is illegal traveled to kenya, mozambique and ghana with the support of elton john aids foundation (@ejaf ) to continue our work sharing lgbtqi+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. around the world, grants made by the elton john aids foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. for more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org // this is a @witness_change project. for more stories of survival please follow @whereloveisillegal

3 weeks ago comment 36 star 3,176

Photo @hammond_robin for @onedayinmyworld . “we buried them in the jungle,” says 26 year old mohammad yunis speaking of the bodies of his relatives killed by myanmar soldiers. sitting with his son, mohammad osman, he details his trauma - “i’m not feeling well here… my brain has become out of control.” that trauma has affected his heatlh - “i used to be fat. i’m getting thinner and thinner, day by day, thinking about what happened.” médecins sans frontières @doctorswithoutborders has been treating mohammad from their clinic outside the refugee camp in bangladesh where he fled to after the violence. “i started taking medicines - they help me.”
//
one of life’s greatest misconceptions is a simple fable. that time is a healer. one year ago “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the myanmar military against the rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. nearly a million rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in bangladesh. many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. all are traumatized. here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of ptsd affected and depressed people on earth.
//
#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. this work was made in collaboration with médecins sans frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. to see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld

3 weeks ago comment 33 star 3,488

Photo @hammond_robin for @onedayinmyworld ”every single moment i remember this,” says 25 year old rohingya refugee rohima khatun recounting the events of a year ago. her story is horrifically typical. after encircling her village, the myanmar military started burning houses. they went house to house and shot the men, including rohima’s husband. five months pregnant and in shock, rohima held her four-year-old to her chest, and her screaming six-year-old to her side. a soldier marched forward, picked up the distraught child, and threw him into the burning flames of a house. the screaming stopped. somehow, through the tears and choking smoke, rohima managed to slip away and into the jungle. her four-year-old and unborn child were safe. but rohima’s world was shattered.
//
one of life’s greatest misconceptions is a simple fable. that time is a healer. one year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the myanmar military against the rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. nearly a million rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in bangladesh. many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. all are traumatized. here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of ptsd affected and depressed people on earth.
//
#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. this work was made in collaboration with médecins sans frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. to see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld

3 weeks ago comment 63 star 3,288